Government 2.0 Taskforce » Project Fund http://gov2.net.au Design by Ben Crothers of Catch Media Tue, 04 May 2010 23:55:29 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.6 en hourly 1 Over the Rainbow – Not for Profit PSI Project Ideas http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/09/not-for-profit-psi/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/09/not-for-profit-psi/#comments Fri, 09 Oct 2009 00:08:58 +0000 Peter Alexander [Taskforce Secretariat] http://gov2.net.au/?p=1141 The not-for-profit sector constantly juxtaposes visionary ideas for improving society against a reality of limited resources and expertise – including cheap and timely access to relevant public sector information.

But what if we could change one of the ground rules by opening up public sector data sets for use in a not-for-profit setting?  What possibilities for improving our society and our democracy would this seemingly simple mind-shift open up?

Rather than waiting around for this to happen, the Taskforce has decided to run another contest to fast-track the generation of ideas for using public sector data in a not-for-profit setting, and help the winner turn this idea into a project proposal.

Category Prize

The Taskforce will select the best idea(s) for using public sector information in a not for profit setting and award a cash donation of $5,000 to a charity/not-for-profit organisation of the winner’s choice.  The winner(s) (or their nominated not-for-profit organisation) will be provided assistance from Connecting Up Australia to scope their idea as project proposal that the Taskforce can consider funding from the Project Fund.

Entries for the competition are due by 5pm, October 30 5Pm, November 6, although after that we’ll leave the IdeaScale page open and running for continued discussion and participation.

Also note that as before all submissions will be subject to the IdeaScale Terms and Conditions, which also has instructions about how to create an account for our IdeaScale page.

Visit Government 2.0 Taskforce Ideas – Not For Profit PSI

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Draft Project Fund Contract http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/30/draft-project-fund-contract/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/30/draft-project-fund-contract/#comments Wed, 30 Sep 2009 02:00:39 +0000 Peter Alexander [Taskforce Secretariat] http://gov2.net.au/?p=1109 For your information I am posting the contract with which successful Gov 2.0 Taskforce project proposals will be commissioned. 

This contract will be between Microsoft and the successful Gov 2.0 Taskforce project proposer.  This is necessary as the Project Fund  has been established in partnership with Microsoft from a fund established by Microsoft as a consequence of previous government sales. The contracts are supported by a Deed that between the Department of Finance and Deregulation and Microsoft that ensures the aims of the Taskforce are supported by the Fund.

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Allocating the project fund: we want your ideas http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/22/allocating-the-project-fund-we-want-your-ideas/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/22/allocating-the-project-fund-we-want-your-ideas/#comments Tue, 22 Sep 2009 06:56:17 +0000 Peter Alexander [Taskforce Secretariat] http://gov2.net.au/?p=1072 The Taskforce is still looking for new ways to allocate the Project Fund to fund worthy projects. We’ve already received a number of proposals by email, and we’re considering each on its own merits.

But we want to hear more of your ideas, so in this blog post we’re putting out the call to any interested parties: if you have a proposal for a project that the Taskforce can fund, send us an email and let us know. You need to send it to us in the form of a project proposal of a couple of pages length, so include details like:

  • details of the individual/company providing the quote
  • names and qualifications of key people who will work on the project
  • a brief description of your capabilities/credentials to undertake the work, including past experience doing projects of a similar kind or in a similar area and contact details for two referees who can verify your claims
  • a brief description of you proposed approach to the project, including key project milestones and methodologies you intend to use
  • a budget and a breakdown of key areas of expenditure for the project
  • what contribution (financial or services) you are willing to make to the project
  • the name and phone number of the authorised person for further enquiries
  • any potential conflict of interest that you wish to declare

Our focus here is going to be on funding projects which directly further the Taskforce’s aims – for more information see our Terms of Reference. We’ll try to give full consideration to other project proposals but can’t necessarily promise anything. But in any case we look forward to hearing your ideas on how the Taskforce can use the Project Fund to further the Gov 2 cause in Australia.

The closing date for proposals to be promised consideration is 16 October 2009. After that we may be able to look at them but can’t promise anything.

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Submit a quote for our round two projects http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/17/submit-a-quote-for-our-round-two-projects/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/17/submit-a-quote-for-our-round-two-projects/#comments Thu, 17 Sep 2009 01:02:54 +0000 Nicholas Gruen http://gov2.net.au/?p=998 The Taskforce is currently considering the various quotes we received for our first round of projects and will get the ball rolling on those as soon as possible. But today we’re releasing briefs and asking for quotes on our second round of projects.

This set of projects is about two things: giving the Taskforce inputs that we can use in our final report, and building up agency capabilities in the Web 2.0 space.

Individuals and firms with relevant capabilities are invited to submit quotes to undertake these projects on behalf of the Taskforce.  The usual Fine Print is here, with some changes from the round one tendering process.  Ignore it at your own risk.

We’ve decided to change the process we used for the round one projects. This time, instead of specifying a price for each project, for some we’re giving you an estimated range of what we think the project should cost, for others we’re not providing an estimated budget at all because we don’t want to shape your ideas of the scope.  You may want to give us a quote with a few separate pricing options that we can choose from and to ‘think aloud’ for our benefit. Either way, we’re open to your ideas and want to take a flexible approach to how we deal with quotes. We’re perfectly willing to go back to you and discuss your quote if we think you have a good proposal which just needs some tweaking.

Details of the requirements for each of the round two projects are contained in the project proposal briefs below, which you can download in PDF or RTF format. Note, we are considering the round one projects as projects one through six, and these as projects seven through 13.

If you submit by 4pm AEST on Tuesday 22nd September 2009 we undertake to give your proposal full and fair consideration.  Submit after that time by all means. If your submission is a stand out and there’s still time, we may consider it, but we can’t promise anything.

Project Proposal Briefs

7. Whole of Government Information Publication Scheme

8. Online Engagement Guidance and Web 2.0 Toolkit for Australian Government Agencies

9. Preservation of Web 2.0 Content

10. Framework for Stimulating Information Philanthropy in Australia

11. Hypotheticals — Ethical and Cultural Challenges of Digital Engagement by Government

12. Promoting the Government 2.0 Taskforce and Agenda

  • Deliverable: Implementing a public relations strategy plus accompanying reports
  • Deadline: 30/09/09 (report on strategy)
  • Deadline: 30/11/09 (final report)
  • Project 12 Brief RTF (76k)
  • Project 12 Brief PDF (21k)

13. Government 2.0 Governance and Institutions: Embedding the 2.0 Agenda in the Australian Public Service

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Open for business – quotes needed for Round One of the Project Fund http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/01/open-for-business/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/09/01/open-for-business/#comments Tue, 01 Sep 2009 03:53:14 +0000 Nicholas Gruen http://gov2.net.au/?p=725 Thank you to everyone who commented on the proposed project that we posted for public pontification recently.  Based on your feedback and the input of the Taskforce members we have refined our ideas and decided to proceed with commissioning six of these projects, which will be funded from the Project Fund.  Details of the requirements for each project are contained in the Project Proposal Briefs below, which you can download in PDF or RTF format:

  1. Enhancing the discoverability and accessibility of government information
  2. Identify key barriers within agencies to Government 2.0
  3. Survey of Australian Government Web 2.0 practices
  4. Copyright law and intellectual property
  5. Early leadership in Semantic Web
  6. The value of Public Sector Information for Cultural Institutions

Individuals and firms with relevant capabilities are invited submit quotes to undertake these projects on behalf of the Taskforce.  Before you submit your quote please take the time to read the Fine Print so you understand the terms and conditions that project funding will be based on.  Please also note the deadlines for the project deliverables – we need to move fast on these projects so that they can inform our thinking while we are writing our report.  It is our intention that for many of the projects, much of the work will be interactive with us and may go either to the production of an independent report by you or towards your contributing to outputs that the Taskforce ultimately takes responsibility for.

You will note that we have included estimates of the size of each project in terms of funds. I insisted upon this because, in another life as a consultant, I know how maddening it is not to have any idea of the scope of the project a client is contemplating.  But we are definitely focused on value for money. So please don’t write your brief up to or down from the figure we have quoted.  If you can save us money we’ll be intersted, and if you can add a lot of value by going over our indicative budget, we’ll be interested.  We’ll also consider ourselves welcome to give you a ring and discuss whether parts of your proposed project could be done differently to generate better value. It will also be of value to us if we can develop a trusting relationship in which some flexibility can be built into the contract to enable you to adapt your work at our direction – for instance by payment per hour.

Submitting Quotes

Quotes should be brief (no more than five pages and preferably less) and should contain the following information:

  • details of the individual/company providing the quote
  • names and qualifications of key people who will work on the project
  • a brief description of your capabilities/credentials to undertake the work, including past experience doing projects of a similar kind or in a similar area
  • a brief description of you proposed approach to the project
  • a breakdown of key areas of expenditure for the project
  • what contribution (financial or services) you are willing to make to the project
  • the name and phone number of the authorised person for further enquiries

Quotes can be submitted by email to projects@gov2.net.au:

by 5pm AEST on Wednesday 9 September 2009.

As stated previously, the Australian Government welcomes contributions by private organisations or individuals to the Project Fund or to the Taskforce’s work generally, so if these are not the projects for you and you want to donate your expertise and/or services please send your proposal to projects@gov2.net.au.  If you have an idea for how to spend the project fund then you are welcome to submit it on the same email address.  Please clearly identify it as such a project and it will be considered in the next round of projects.

Project Proposal Briefs

1. Enhancing the discoverability and accessibility of government information

2. Identify key barriers within agencies to Government 2.0

3. Survey of Australian Government Web 2.0 practices

4. Copyright law and intellectual property

5. Early leadership in Semantic Web

6. The value of Public Sector Information for cultural institutions

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Posting proposed projects for public pontification http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/08/18/posting-proposed-projects-for-public-pontification/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/08/18/posting-proposed-projects-for-public-pontification/#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2009 22:48:34 +0000 Nicholas Gruen http://gov2.net.au/?p=586 One of the roles of the Taskforce is to decide on how to allocate the Project Fund to further the interests of Government 2.0 in Australia.

We’ve been discussing and refining a number of research ideas for potential projects so far. They’re not written up as fully specified projects yet, but we’re after your feedback on them.

Feel free to

1. approve or criticise the projects we’ve set out
2. propose improvements to those ideas
3. propose alternative ideas
4. suggest people or firms/agencies that might do a good job of these projects

Please do any of steps 1 to 3 in the specific comments threads relating to the project, and if you want to suggest additional ideas for projects, please do so in the general comments box.

If you want to propose additional projects as suggested in point 4 above, please do so in the comments box corresponding to the whole page.

We’ve set up a list of projects on our Consultation page and we’re after your feedback. We’re already pretty sure we want to go ahead with quite a few of the projects but we’re still open to your ideas on how to improve them.

We’ll be formally deciding to go ahead with many of the projects at our next meeting – on Friday Aug 21st (when we’re also throwing open part of the meeting to the community for a question and answer session), so your feedback will be most influential if you get us your feedback by 1.00 PM Thursday.

We’re excited to see what comes out of this process, and look forwarding to hearing your ideas.

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Welcome to the Government 2.0 Taskforce http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/06/22/launch-speech/ http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/06/22/launch-speech/#comments Sun, 21 Jun 2009 22:00:48 +0000 Nicholas Gruen http://gov2t.wordpress.com/?p=12

The expression Web 2.0 was coined by Tim O’Reilly . . .

Let me start that again.  The line you have last read is well . . . wrong.  I’ve been saying that Tim O’Reilly coined the expression for a while now – quoting other sources. But, wanting to check dates and link to an authoritative source Wikipedia corrected me. I think I first checked my facts on this from Wikipedia a while back.  But the world has moved on.*  This is what Wikipedia said at the time of writing this post. “The term “Web 2.0″ was coined by Darcy DiNucci in 1999.” So welcome to the world of Web 2.0, a world in which the internet has morphed from being an increasingly useful platform for connecting governments and firms with citizens for ‘point to point’ broadcasting and feedback, to being a platform for collaborative endeavour.

That’s the platform that brought us the extraordinary phenomenon of Wikipedia where people collaborate to build an encyclopedia in ‘real time’.  I think of the miracle of software that writes itself – open source software – as the original Web 2.0 phenomenon, though some disagree because its roots go back at least to the early 1990s (depending on how you define terms).  Then again, as I argued in a couple of pieces recently, Web 2.0 is a world in which public assets assemble themselves with no central funding from government. Language is the quintessential public good.  Yet no one passed the hat around to fund its development.  It developed as an accretion of life itself, as a byproduct of our natural human sociality. In fact there are lots of these (what I’ve called) ‘emergent public goods’ around, and yet economists have paid surprisingly little attention to them.

Another ‘emergent public good’ is government itself.  In one sense it’s paradoxical that so many private firms and indeed individuals are building the assets of Web 2.0 when they stand to harvest for themselves such a small share of the benefits it creates.  Governments on the other hand are collectively funded so that they can serve collective needs.

Of course to non-economists none of this is very surprising or paradoxical.  Governments must operate through large bureaucracies.  And those bureaucracies are subject to a panoply of ‘due process’ requirements. They must be fair and be seen to be fair.  They live in fear of having their activities, whether sensible or less so, being misrepresented in the heat of political battle and reported on by a media that is hungry for engaging stories to tell.  As the law currently stands a public servant risks imprisonment for disclosing government information without authority to do so.  And of course there are numerous cultural issues.

So it’s no surprise that governments have been relatively slow to take up Web 2.0.  This is the conclusion that Tim Davies came to recently.

Working with front-line professionals in local government over the last couple of months, I’ve been coming to see that:

  • The big challenges are not about technology – they are about the content and the process of mobilisation and communication.
  • When it comes to technology we’ve not got one big challenge we’ve got 100s of small challenges – and we’ve got no systematic way of dealing with them.

When all these small challenges stack up – the chance of staff members or teams in local or national government organisations and agencies being able to effectively engage with online-enabled policy making shrinks and shrinks.

Our Taskforce gives us the opportunity to consider that hypothesis about what’s holding us back.  More importantly, we will be proposing solutions where we can.  And we won’t be limiting ourselves to words.  The Project Fund enables us to take action now to fund competitions and other initiatives, either exploratory or otherwise, to get going on our journey towards Government 2.0.

And we need your help.   So please join our community and let us know what you think and how we can move more swiftly and surely.

An afterthought

* Until the 27th of May, Wikipedia’s first usage of the expression “Web 2.0″ was December 2003.   Then at 04:24, on the 27 May 2009Octavabasso set us straight with the goods about Nancy DiNucci’s use of the word in 1999.

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