Comments on: Inquiries 2.0: Part 3.0 http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/ Design by Ben Crothers of Catch Media Wed, 28 Apr 2010 12:51:50 +1000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.8.6 hourly 1 By: Madeleine Kingston http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-13181 Madeleine Kingston Mon, 12 Apr 2010 11:17:52 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-13181 PS Love the idea of officials being prepared to respond with photo IDs. Challenges the concept of Mia Garlick's gripping wordless article on The Faceless Bureaucrat. Some of us have not been part of the face-to-face dialogue, but have commencing the e-dialogue cold - but warming up, like climate change. In any case if you are all as warm and enthusiastic as you sound, what's in a face? Cheers Madeleine PS

Love the idea of officials being prepared to respond with photo IDs. Challenges the concept of Mia Garlick’s gripping wordless article on The Faceless Bureaucrat.

Some of us have not been part of the face-to-face dialogue, but have commencing the e-dialogue cold – but warming up, like climate change.

In any case if you are all as warm and enthusiastic as you sound, what’s in a face?

Cheers

Madeleine

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By: Madeleine Kingston http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-13180 Madeleine Kingston Mon, 12 Apr 2010 11:06:52 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-13180 Have to agree with Andy Williamson in his penultimate para above that there are no longer any excuses for active citizen-government partnerships not to become a reality. Ron Lubensky in "Crowd-sourcing is not empowering enough" refers to the "seed of democracy" that has accompanied technological progression and appears skeptical about its value. I disagree. The time is ripe for considering new ways to embrace democracy, with new opportunities. Let us not waste the chances to find out if there is a better way of governance. I have the same concerns as others about the biggest challenge being cultural and attitudinal organizational adjustment, which must be prefaced by education and persuasion so that the collaborative concept is not lost. Entrenched organizational culture has been the vexing subject of much management theory literature. It is potentially the most significant barrier. Readiness for change is not something that can be manufactured like a tangible commodity, but without the right stage of readiness it would be hard to move ahead. As a scroll through postings and background of Gov2 can't help but feel the sense of excitement and buzz that have grabbed those involved. It's infectious. Carry on. Madeleine, Newcomer Have to agree with Andy Williamson in his penultimate para above that there are no longer any excuses for active citizen-government partnerships not to become a reality.

Ron Lubensky in “Crowd-sourcing is not empowering enough” refers to the “seed of democracy” that has accompanied technological progression and appears skeptical about its value.

I disagree. The time is ripe for considering new ways to embrace democracy, with new opportunities. Let us not waste the chances to find out if there is a better way of governance.

I have the same concerns as others about the biggest challenge being cultural and attitudinal organizational adjustment, which must be prefaced by education and persuasion so that the collaborative concept is not lost.

Entrenched organizational culture has been the vexing subject of much management theory literature. It is potentially the most significant barrier. Readiness for change is not something that can be manufactured like a tangible commodity, but without the right stage of readiness it would be hard to move ahead.

As a scroll through postings and background of Gov2 can’t help but feel the sense of excitement and buzz that have grabbed those involved.

It’s infectious. Carry on.

Madeleine, Newcomer

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By: Club Troppo » Esprit de l’escalier http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-9426 Club Troppo » Esprit de l’escalier Fri, 05 Mar 2010 14:32:30 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-9426 [...] people, having them feel listened to, in spreading the word of our inquiry and in drawing in experts from around the world.  So I can’t see why those bodies which are charged with conducting independent public [...] [...] people, having them feel listened to, in spreading the word of our inquiry and in drawing in experts from around the world.  So I can’t see why those bodies which are charged with conducting independent public [...]

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By: David Eaves | Connect IT Conference 2010 http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-8743 David Eaves | Connect IT Conference 2010 Thu, 18 Feb 2010 22:39:22 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-8743 [...] advocacy, David advises several open source projects including OpenMRS and Mozilla, serves on the International Reference Group of Australia’s Web 2.0 Taskforce and the Steering Committee of the Environics Institute Urban Aboriginal People’s Survey. He [...] [...] advocacy, David advises several open source projects including OpenMRS and Mozilla, serves on the International Reference Group of Australia’s Web 2.0 Taskforce and the Steering Committee of the Environics Institute Urban Aboriginal People’s Survey. He [...]

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By: Die drei Gesetze der offenen Daten | eaves.ca http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-5009 Die drei Gesetze der offenen Daten | eaves.ca Mon, 30 Nov 2009 12:36:23 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-5009 [...] offene Datenportal in Kanada. Kürzlich wurde ich seitens der Australischen Regierung gebeten, der Internationalen Referenzgruppe für die dortige Government 2.0 Taskforce beizusitzen.Offensichtlich ist die Bewegung für offene Regierung sehr gross, jedoch hat mich meine jüngste [...] [...] offene Datenportal in Kanada. Kürzlich wurde ich seitens der Australischen Regierung gebeten, der Internationalen Referenzgruppe für die dortige Government 2.0 Taskforce beizusitzen.Offensichtlich ist die Bewegung für offene Regierung sehr gross, jedoch hat mich meine jüngste [...]

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By: Nicholas Gruen http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-3338 Nicholas Gruen Sun, 01 Nov 2009 04:33:06 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-3338 Postscript: you can now watch the talk <a href="http://www.cebit.com.au/2009/conferences/gov-2/speakers/nicholas-gruen" rel="nofollow">here</a>. Postscript: you can now watch the talk here.

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By: simonfj http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-2712 simonfj Sun, 25 Oct 2009 22:01:12 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-2712 Nic, that's just wonderful! <blockquote>Let's be clear about one thing though. public information is to be managed “for public purposes, and [as] an <strong>INTERnational</strong> resource.</blockquote> If that's the case then we need to introduce the international e-gov communities to those in e-research, so they can share a few tools. <a href="http://www.eresearch.edu.au/programme" rel="nofollow">Here's the programme</a>. And <a href="http://www.eresearch.edu.au/jbell2009" rel="nofollow">here are a couple of engineers</a> who are addressing the real time comms cultural conundrum, from a global engineer's perspective. Can't have you wearing out your shoeleather, or airline seat, getting to and from conferences, can we? Coming up with a way to run (a series of) distributed conferences (say three sites at one time) shouldn't be too hard to forumulate. Recording them is built into <a href="http://evo.caltech.edu/" rel="nofollow">EVO</a>. Systemizing the streaming through this domain and porting them to a broadcast station, like <a href="http://www.a-pac.tv/" rel="nofollow">a-pac</a> or a <a href="http://www.researchchannel.org/news/overview.asp" rel="nofollow">researchchannel</a>, shouldn't be too hard either. (they could use the content) But I think the team needs to, apart from considering <a href="http://www.sitepoint.com/forums/" rel="nofollow">a real online forum</a>, think about the archive for our global inquiry. This is going to be important, especially if, like craig is talking about with <em>"a shareable (template) strategy"</em>, we will see this domain pointing at records held at other domains, like twitter and facebook. Cause everyone is going to start copy you shortly. Nic, that’s just wonderful!

Let’s be clear about one thing though. public information is to be managed “for public purposes, and [as] an INTERnational resource.

If that’s the case then we need to introduce the international e-gov communities to those in e-research, so they can share a few tools. Here’s the programme. And here are a couple of engineers who are addressing the real time comms cultural conundrum, from a global engineer’s perspective. Can’t have you wearing out your shoeleather, or airline seat, getting to and from conferences, can we?

Coming up with a way to run (a series of) distributed conferences (say three sites at one time) shouldn’t be too hard to forumulate. Recording them is built into EVO. Systemizing the streaming through this domain and porting them to a broadcast station, like a-pac or a researchchannel, shouldn’t be too hard either. (they could use the content)

But I think the team needs to, apart from considering a real online forum, think about the archive for our global inquiry. This is going to be important, especially if, like craig is talking about with “a shareable (template) strategy”, we will see this domain pointing at records held at other domains, like twitter and facebook. Cause everyone is going to start copy you shortly.

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By: Andy Williamson http://gov2.net.au/blog/2009/10/23/inquiries-2-0-part-3-0/comment-page-1/#comment-2626 Andy Williamson Fri, 23 Oct 2009 13:40:08 +0000 http://gov2.net.au/?p=1237#comment-2626 Nicholas and team, Thanks for the opportunity to participate in the Gov2.0 taksforce. Having just returned from Canberra, I was exicted about the buzz there. It feels like things are happening in this space downunder (and as a kiwi exiled in the wintery north, that's great news!!) What was most refreshing for me was hearing not just the right words (especially from senior politicians) but seeing demonstrable buy-in and action from government as well as those outside government. It was pleasing of itself to meet so many people with senior roles inside government (commonwealth and state) who were talking up and taking seriously the potential for web2.0 in government. As I said on Monday in Canberra, it's not the role of one or other side to do this, it's for both - government and citizens. Data is a national treasure, absolutely, and it's a public resource - and government doesn't always know what best to do with it. Government holds this data in trust and has a duty to release it just as citizens have a right to access it. Now the challange is on one hand to find innovative new ways to disapate, connect and add value to this data and, on the other, to continue responsible stewardship for the integrity of that data. We don't consume democracy, we are active participants in it and Web2.0 has removed the excuses for this becoming a reality. But not the barriers, they remain cultural and attitudinal, so let's not lose sight of the step-change in organisaitonal culture that must accompany this digital revolution. No longer are there any fair excuses preventing government opeing up data or from citizen-built initiatives feeding into the policy process just as government-built ones do. I'm looking forward to seeing the taskforce develop, to the ideas that come out of it and above all the continued dialogue (and I hope that I can contribute a little as we go along this journey). Andy Nicholas and team, Thanks for the opportunity to participate in the Gov2.0 taksforce. Having just returned from Canberra, I was exicted about the buzz there. It feels like things are happening in this space downunder (and as a kiwi exiled in the wintery north, that’s great news!!) What was most refreshing for me was hearing not just the right words (especially from senior politicians) but seeing demonstrable buy-in and action from government as well as those outside government. It was pleasing of itself to meet so many people with senior roles inside government (commonwealth and state) who were talking up and taking seriously the potential for web2.0 in government.

As I said on Monday in Canberra, it’s not the role of one or other side to do this, it’s for both – government and citizens. Data is a national treasure, absolutely, and it’s a public resource – and government doesn’t always know what best to do with it. Government holds this data in trust and has a duty to release it just as citizens have a right to access it. Now the challange is on one hand to find innovative new ways to disapate, connect and add value to this data and, on the other, to continue responsible stewardship for the integrity of that data.

We don’t consume democracy, we are active participants in it and Web2.0 has removed the excuses for this becoming a reality. But not the barriers, they remain cultural and attitudinal, so let’s not lose sight of the step-change in organisaitonal culture that must accompany this digital revolution. No longer are there any fair excuses preventing government opeing up data or from citizen-built initiatives feeding into the policy process just as government-built ones do.

I’m looking forward to seeing the taskforce develop, to the ideas that come out of it and above all the continued dialogue (and I hope that I can contribute a little as we go along this journey).

Andy

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